Thursday, March 26, 2009

Job Trends: Tomcat, Spring, Weblogic, JBoss, EJB

Forrester recently described a trend that they refer to as "lean software" in their paper entitled Lean Software Is Agile, Fit-To-Purpose, And Efficient. They state that "lean software is emerging as the antidote to bloatware" and that "the trend toward lean software has been building for years, but the worldwide recession is accelerating it".

Forrester mentions SpringSource as one of four companies at the forefront of the lean software movement. This is due to our leadership within the Spring, Apache, Groovy and Grails communities, as well as our active encouragement, via SpringSource dm Server, of enterprise OSGi as the basis for next-generation application infrastructure.

Since Spring and Apache Tomcat play an important role in lean application infrastructure strategies, I've researched what the job market looks like for developers with Spring and Tomcat skills as compared to EJB, Weblogic, and JBoss skills.


I used Indeed.com to generate the chart above. Indeed.com searches millions of jobs from thousands of job sites and provides a neat service that lets you see job trends for whatever search criteria you may have.

My criteria was Java Developers that have Tomcat, Spring, Weblogic, JBoss, or EJB skills. Click here to go to Indeed.com to see the latest view of my chart above.

The chart nicely illustrates that Spring skills (green line) are in highest demand, well ahead of the others, and has been on a steep incline for the past year. Weblogic skills (blue line) are next and have remained fairly flat over the years. EJB skills (red line) and Tomcat skills (orange line) are neck and neck behind that, with JBoss skills (black line) tracking behind Tomcat but on a similar path.

NOTE: I've been asked why I did not include Glassfish, Geronimo, or WebSphere CE in the above chart. The reason is simple: they were effectively zero on the graph and therefore statistically irrelevant for my analysis.

UPDATED ON MARCH 30 2009:
Let me reiterate that the point of this post is to show that Spring and Tomcat Java developer skills are as easy to find in today's job market as other popular enterprise Java developer skills. With that said, I've been asked why I did not include WebSphere in the chart above. One could argue that WebSphere as a brand is broader than the other items in the search criteria, but I've modified the criteria to include it; the chart now covers Java Developers that have Tomcat, Spring, Weblogic, JBoss, EJB, or WebSphere skills.

Click here to go to Indeed.com to see the latest view of the chart above.

Conclusions?
More and more companies are looking at lean application infrastructure to help them remain competitive, and the difficult economy is only accelerating this trend. These businesses not only need to feel comfortable with the technologies they embrace, but they also need to make sure they can easily find people experienced with the technologies.

Since I work at SpringSource, I have a keen interest in the health and vibrancy of both Spring and Tomcat. I'm happy to see that Spring and Tomcat are doing so well in the job market for Java developers. This fact will help my customers feel more comfortable choosing SpringSource Enterprise and SpringSource tc Server to power their applications.

Credits: I'd like to thank Indeed.com for providing this valuable job trends service on their website. It provides a great way to understand the past and current directions of whatever type of job you may be interested in.

6 comments:

Jim Lynch said...

What were the 4 companies listed at the forefront? SpringSource and what other 3?

thanks jim

Shaun Connolly said...

Hi Jim,

Forrester listed Google, Salesforce.com, Red Hat, and SpringSource as examples of companies leading the lean software movement.

John said...

Now re-run the chart with "j2ee and developer" included (which includes EJB), and the results put the rest of the query in perspective:
http://www.indeed.com/jobtrends?q=tomcat+and+java+and+developer%2C+weblogic+and+java+and+developer%2C+spring+and+java+and+developer%2C+jboss+and+java+and+developer%2C+ejb+and+java+and+developer%2C+j2ee+and+developer&l=

John Clingan
GlassFish Group Product Manager

John said...

Re-post of prior comment with shortened URL (apologies):

Now re-run the chart with "j2ee and developer" included (which includes EJB), and the results put the rest of the query in perspective:

http://tinyurl.com/cbvwn4

John Clingan
GlassFish Group Product Manager

Shaun Connolly said...

Hi John,

I chose the most popular app servers (Tomcat, WebSphere, Weblogic, JBoss) and I threw in Spring and EJB into the mix since many people compare/contrast the two programming models.

Adding J2EE into the chart adds no real value in my opinion since it is a superset term that in a job search would likely also include at least one of the terms I specified.

My aim is NOT to minimize the importance of J2EE. SpringSource and the other vendors operate within the J2EE landscape.

My aim is to illustrate job market for specific skills and I chose Java as my general modifier rather than J2EE.

John said...

Understood, but IMHO, it is insufficient to include EJB without including J2EE. Many posting jobs specify J2EE in general and not EJB in particular. For example, to better match spring with ejb, changing "spring" to "spring framework" shows very different results.